Archive for the ‘The Skinny Pancake’ Tag

The Seth Yacovone Blues band at The Skinny Pancake and The Thursday Torys, Laura Wolf and The Dead Shakers at Big Heavy World July 20, 2018   Leave a comment

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The Seth Yacovone Blues Band pic by Tim Lewis

 

I had a great time seeing music on Friday at The Skinny Pancake Burlington and Big Heavy World. I had a relaxed day then took the warm and lovely walk downtown around 4. I got in and settled at SP around 20 after and the Seth Yacovone Blues Band was on stage ripping it up. He was joined by Jeff Salsibury on drums and Jan Schultz on bass. They created wonderful platforms that Seth used to reach for the sky. They played a song about Mr Farmer then played the Albert King classic As The Years Go Passing By. Seth pulled out an epic guitar solo that lit up the crowd. His playing was more playful on the one about being in love with miss Ann then they played one about how the minds eye wanders. They sang about rocks in your pillow and snatching your bag, then took a break. They came back with a cool bluesy instrumental then played a song with a darker tone and a searing guitar. It was about how the whole world is fighting about the same thing. It was hot and sunny on the deck of the Pancake so Seth’s song about how the sun is shining was quite appropriate. Good thing there was a nice breeze that day. They rocked out a song about being twenty miles out of town then sang a cheery number about how I should have quit you a long time ago. The one about how somewhere there’s a home gave hope then he encouraged us put the shoe on the other foot and walk just like me. The one about how I love you pretty baby, don’t know what to say or do was nice and the one about E. coli and mad cow disease was a little more tough. They played a slow bluesy song about how the harder I try the more I end up on the floor and Seth let loose a wicked solo at the end. They left us with Further On Up The Road and as the last note rang out, I took them up on their advice.

They wrapped up around 6:30 then I walked over to Pine Street heading towards BHW. Showtime was set for 7 and since showtimes this week had been running 30-60 minutes late, I stopped at Dedalus Wine Shop, Market, & Wine Bar for a delicious glass of White Burgundy.

I arrived at Big Heavy World around 7:20 and The Thursday Torys were on stage. Grr, I could have been there at the start. Oh well. It was just Brayden Patrick Baird solo but his voice and guitar nicely carried the songs. He sang about taking every hit that she’s got to know the feeling that we are alive. He switched to mini piano for a song about the coming of winter called Everybody’s Sad. That ended the show. I really should have caught more but loved what I heard. As a side note, I think he said he was playing solo since the rest of the band had food poisoning or subpoenas or something. I will have to catch up with them again soon.

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The Thursday Torys pic by Tim Lewis

 

The set break was short then Laura Wolf began to play. Her indie rock cello sound was augmented by many loops and wispy vocals. The full effect was a dreamy mix as all the songs flowed together. She sang about about being scared of leaving when I’m leaving you and waves coming to shore. Her quietly gorgeous songs mesmerized the room. I’m not sure how many she played since I got lost in the set. She finished with something about can’t you see hopes and prayers that finally broke the spell when she wrapped it up. What a lovely set.

 

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Laura Wolf pic by Tim Lewis

The next set break was long enough to go to ArtsRiot and grab a drink, chat with one of by bosses who was hanging with friends at the food truck event happening outside, finish said drink, then pop back into the no alcohol Big Heavy World.

My timing was back to the usual standards and I got settled in as The Dead Shakers began to play. With a similar, but slightly different band line-up, the sound was a little more rocking and a little less funky than when I saw them on Tuesday. The baritone sax was gone, Lauren Costello was back with her cello and effects and there was a little more fire in the guitar. They opened with something about there I go then played a heavy jam that reminded Matthew Kloss of Ain’t No Sunshine When She’s gone. They played a cheery song about nuclear war coming soon then took us to the sentimental time of the night. They jammed out the next two then Kevin Bloom told a story about a child that was eaten by a bird. Taung Child was fun as always. They played a funky jam with a shredding guitar then sang waste not want not. They closed the 11 song set by encouraging our Superpowers. It’s always a good time when the Shakers play. It might be different from the last time, but it’s always great.

I hung out and chatted for a bit then took the lovely walk home. I ran into Arty LaVigne outside the Flynn and he said Bruce Hornsby was amazing. I ran into Phoebe Zorn and Chrusty Barnacles on Church Street and chatted for a bit, then went home and happily collapsed. What a great night

 

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The Dead Shakers pic by Tim Lewis

 

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Swale and Gestalt at The Skinny Pancake March 17, 2018   Leave a comment

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Gestalt pic by Tim Lewis

 

I had a great time seeing music a couple of Saturdays ago at The Skinny Pancake Burlington. I took the lovely walk downtown and got in and settled. I chatted with some cool people and soon enough, it was time for the show.

Gestalt took the stage and shared their old school low-fi indie rock. As they settled in they reminded me of Burlington bands from the early ’90’s, but as they kept going they added a romantic sweep to the sound. My notes didn’t catch much of what the songs were about, but a between song commentary about the coming of spring was endearing. Right before the end of the set bassist/singer Meredith Davey told the audience that we had to go do something nice for someone else and that nobody was exempt. You’ve got to love that. They played one more cool song and called it a set. I need to see them again.

It was not a long break, then SWALE took the stage. They began with a slow version of Felon then bopped along with Waiting For You. Golden Crutch was searing and Soul Piggy Bank was as poignant as always. They played a mellow version of Old School then rocked a bit on Loser. They picked up the pace with Release Your Records and rocked hard on Jack Sharp. All Down Tonight had a great groove and a rocking ending. They rocked Cancer nice and hard and eased up for a gorgeous version of Bird In A Cage. They stayed a bit mellow for Beaten Down and ramped back up with Joyless. Elevator was painfully beautiful and Safe To Say soared through the room. Drug Laws surged with full fury. Someone requested some Black Sabbath (Scott Decker?) and they played an amazing version of Hand Of Doom. They brought the music back to top speed for Everyone Likes To then called it a night.

I hung out for a bit and chatted with Luke Adam and Andriana Chobot then took the long lovely walk home.

 

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Swale pic by Tim Lewis

Posted April 2, 2018 by tmusicfan in Rock Shows

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Azarian Family Hoo Haw with Peg Tassey at Light Club Lamp Shop and Breakfast With The Boys and Binger at The Skinny Pancake July 29, 2017   1 comment

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Peg Tassey and Ethan Azarian pic by Tim Lewis

I had a great time seeing music Saturday at Light Club Lamp Shop and The Skinny Pancake Burlington. It was a lovely day and I got out of work a little early and had time to just hang out for a bit. Around 5:45 I took the easy walk downtown. The show was set to start at 6 but the stage was just beginning to be set up. I chatted with Charlie Messing for a half hour or so then it was time for the Azarian Family Hoo Haw to begin. A woman named Kendra took the stage with a Ukulele. I let the first song wash over me and was in a happy place. Charlie commented on how good of a singer she was. For the second song a guy named Jeff joined her and played the musical saw. The song was about laying your comfort down and sounded quiet somber and lovely. A song about a hard rain followed then a woman named Lindsay came up and sang backing vocals. The song was about leaving my baby and was the last of Kendra’s set.

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Kendra and Jeff pic by Tim Lewis

Up next, Lindsay took the stage and sang and played a slow eerie banjo with some effects and looping. She was joined by Jeff on the saw and chimes and phones. The gentle haunting sound was beautiful. They played songs about cold rain and sun and a howling Texas wind. Kendra joined them for a song that might have been called In Dreams. They closed the set with Kendra using a bow on something that looked like a small xylophone while Jeff used a bow on the saw and Lindsay used a bow on the banjo. The song about the wind and rolling sea was gorgeous.

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Lindsay and Jeff pic by Tim Lewis

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Lindsay, Jeff, and Kendra pic by Tim Lewis

Being a warm sunny day, the mighty Ethan Azarian opened with a song about the cold winter and putting your summer clothes away. Jeff and Lindsay have been playing with Ethan in Austin for a while and they added a nice touch to his sound. They brought up Kendra to sing backing vocals through a phone for an anti-marriage song about the lovebirds. Ethan’s quirky lyrics made The Zebra Who Runs Through The Night especially fun. They played songs about seeing you in the promised land and seeing you when they get home. They played the title song of Ethan’s new album When You Were Young then rocked out a song called Josephine. They brought up Peg Tassey MUSIC for a special treat. Jeff played saw and Ethan played acoustic guitar and Peg played acoustic and she sang the legendary Ethan Is Stoned. I’ve loved that song for a long time and was in heaven for every note. Ethan closed the set with a song about Joe playing that Sally Ann Slow and picking up his fiddle and bow. Everything about the set was fun.

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Ethan, Jeff, and Lindsay pic by Tim Lewis

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Peg Tassey, Ethan Azarian, and Jeff pic by Tim Lewis

I had thought about trying to catch some music at Sidebar but the time was running late so I just headed down to The Skinny Pancake. I got in and got a drink and wandered out to the patio as Breakfast With The Boys were wrapping up their set. They played a rollicking Whipping Post then a song with a bit of a Latin groove. The woman who sang had a great and powerful voice. They played one more fun song and that was that. I hung out for a bit then Binger took the stage. They sound checked with Fearless but began the set for real with If I Knew. The next song had a reggae vibe and was about all of the things I do. They played a new song called Sideways that was really nice. A cover of Natalie Imburglia’s Torn bounced nicely then they played a song about the spaces in between. They made me smile with a killer version of The Feeling Is Strange. A cover of Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots was fun and kept the smile on my face. They played another new song about a memory that had a ferocious jam at the end. A cover of Shakedown Street made everyone happy then they rocked out Strings. Covers of Can I Kick It and Jumper were fun. They played a hot damn funk jam then rocked out King Vice. They played two more, including Check Your Pockets and called it a night. It had been ages since I had seen Binger play a full show and their 16 song set was as good of a time as always.

I hung out for a bit and said a couple of quick goodbyes then took the long walk home.

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Breakfast With The Boys pic by Tim Lewis

 

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Binger pic by Tim Lewis

 

Gneiss at Red Square and Close Encounters and Binger at The Skinny Pancake June 18, 2016   Leave a comment

Gneiss at Red Square June 18, 2016

Gneiss at Red Square June 18, 2016

 

I had a great day of music yesterday. I began the day by writing up Friday’s epic day of music then had a little bit of time to relax before heading over to the party. I got an invite from Molly and Lauren from Rapid Fire Magazine for a party by the lake in Colchester. My evening was booked with music, but I thought I had enough time to go hang out for an hour or so. I arrived a little after five and met Paul Allison. After a bit Jamie and Anna from Cranial Perch arrived and it was nice to see them again. Gary Lane was there too and we had fun talking about music and living by the lake.

I drove home, then walked downtown and arrived a couple of minutes late for gneiss who were playing at Red Square from 7-11. I missed them the last time they were in town so I felt I really had to put in the effort to see them. Of course, I was nicely rewarded for doing so with the lovely sound of their music. With Naomi Galimidi on keys, Jesse Cowan on 5 string bass, Jacob Blodgett on drums and Johnny Meli on guitar they have an earthy organic flowing sound. The songs felt loosely structured and open to change as the mood struck. Naomi sang some of the time and both her voice and the sound of her keys sounded warm and friendly and just made me want to smile. Jesse’s bass was plucked mightily as he easily navigated each changing flow of the song. Johnny sang some of the songs and has a nice voice and his guitar playing flowed from chords to sweet leads almost effortlessly. One song they played was called ‘Bye Stander (?) and had a nice flow. One song jammed for a while then fell into For What It’s Worth. I think it was Water Is Rising that had some over the top drum work from Jake. A song with the line What A Lovely Day had a bit of an English Prog Rock feel and was a perfect sentiment for a band playing in the alley while the sun steamed down light and heat and their music flowed out into Church st. I hung out for a full set, about an hour or a little more then chatted with the band and got a CD. Yea, more music for my radio show on WBKM

 

Close Encounters at The Skinny Pancake June 18 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Close Encounters at The Skinny Pancake June 18 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

I headed down the hill to The Skinny Pancake and right at 8:30 Close Encounters began playing on the outdoor stage. As you walk into the restaurant there is a little bit of seating to your right and a lot to the left. Just past the seating on the left they have the band set up against the building wall and this seems to be the best setup I’ve seen there. Encounters are a four-piece band with singer/electric guitar, bass, drums, and singer/keyboard player. If you drew a line between jam and indie rock Encounters would be almost exactly half way in between. A lot of the music had a nice flow to it but there was also some hard rocking. One song called Future Ladies had a bit of a disco vibe. The band sounded really good and everyone played well but the drummer was just the star of the show. He just went crazy on every song and I just loved it. They played about 45 minutes and ended with a song called Stolen which rocked hard at the end. It made me happy.

 

Binger at The Skinny Pancake June 18 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Binger at The Skinny Pancake June 18 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

Binger hit the stage at 9:30 with a groove called Now Check Your Pocket. They have such a smooth sound and mix elements of soul and rock and jazz and calypso and lively a few more, yet it sounds beautifully coherent. Shak Ear plays bass and sings and raps. Braden Winslow plays guitar and sings and raps. Dalton Muzzy just plays drums and his playing is subtle and powerful and always on target. The band mostly stuck with songs from the new album Skeptics and a few covers. If I Knew sounded great. I missed the cover song after that. Strings followed and it is such a cool song. As the set unfolded they treated us to a couple of new songs, which were really good. They tossed in covers like Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots Pt. 1 by The Flaming Lips and Breathe by Pink Floyd the latter of which sounded especially great when brought into the Binger sound. Buttonz, from the Roots In The Rabbit Hole, let Shakir really shine. Towards the end of the show they played Resurrection In Sanskrit and I’m pretty sure it was both parts 1 and 2. Either way, Braden’s guitar playing was stellar. I did not catch the name of the song that ended the 90 minute show, but like everything they do, it was a joy to experience.

After the show I said a couple of quick goodbyes and went home and collapsed. It’s been a couple of great days of seeing music and I feel so lucky to be able to put in just a little bit of effort and get so heavily rewarded.

 

Invisible Homes and Violent Mae at the Skinny Pancake and The High Breaks at Juniper March 25, 2016   Leave a comment

Invisible Homes at the Skinny Pancake March 25, 2016 Picture by Tim Lewis

Invisible Homes at the Skinny Pancake March 25, 2016 Picture by Tim Lewis

I had a great time seeing music last night. I was a little slow to get out the door and arrived at the Skinny Pancake around 8:40. Apparently, they were not kidding about the 8:30 start time and Invisible Homes were on stage when I walked in. I settled in, found a spot to stand and listened. I recognized a couple of songs from their first album, but most of the show was new. The songs ranged through several styles, art rock, jazz, electronic, and likely a few more. All of the songs were well crafted and the musicianship of the band was top notch. At times the music would go out to an edge, then come back and resolve itself into some sweet melodies. One song had a Fripp sounding guitar running all the way through. The show was not super long, but completely captivating for every note. They closed with the song that had been running through my head all day, This Machine, and I was in a very happy place. After the show I saw a setlist lying around and noticed that they had opened with my favorite of their songs, Above The Frequency. Urgh, all I had to do was leave a couple of minutes earlier and I would have gotten to see it. Next time.

Homes had a lot of gear on the stage so the breakdown took a bit of time. Soon enough Violent Mae took the stage. They are a duo with a drummer and a woman singer guitar player. Their songs had a low-fi indie sort of sound that did not grab me. I really enjoyed the sound of her voice, but wasn’t hooked by the music. I hung out for three songs, because you just have to give a band a chance. It still wasn’t working for me, so I headed out.

I walked up Battery street, turned on to Cherry street and wandered into Juniper as The High Breaks were playing a surf version of Wicked World. I grabbed a beer, got settled and they played another of their cool surf songs then took a break. I chatted a bit with Todd Gevry, Kevin Lynam, and Matthew Bryan Hagen, then wandered around and ran into Casey Merlin Rae. The music started up again so I headed back to the stage and rocked out to a mix of the Breaks own songs and some classics. They played classics like Shifty, A Walk On Ballard Beach, and The Big One. They tossed in covers of Penetration by the Ventures (which was mixed with Sweet Leaf by Sabbath), Symptom Of The Universe, Misirlou, and Wipeout. As they went to wrap up one guy wanted to turn his son on to the music so the Breaks played two encore songs for him. They are such great guys.

After the set I headed out quickly. The walk home was quick and happy.

 

 

Violent Mae at the Skinny Pancake March 25, 2016 Picture by Tim Lewis

Violent Mae at the Skinny Pancake March 25, 2016 Picture by Tim Lewis

The High Breaks at Juniper at Hotel Vermont March 25, 2016 Picture by Tim Lewis

The High Breaks at Juniper at Hotel Vermont March 25, 2016 Picture by Tim Lewis

Phil Yates & The Affiliates at The Skinny Pancake, Maryse Smith and Arc Iris at Light Club Lamp Shop and Wave Of The Future at Finnegan’s October 30, 2015   Leave a comment

Light Club Lamp Shop photo by Tim Lewis

Light Club Lamp Shop photo by Tim Lewis

There was way too much music happening tonight in town. I had to work until 9 so I totally blew off all the music that was happening earlier. It was slow at work and they let me out early, and asked me to come in late tomorrow. Plans changed quickly.
I grabbed a bite to eat and headed to The Skinny Pancake and arrived just as Phil Yates & The Affiliates were about to go on. I said hi to Charlie Messing and watched the band play a killer version of Elvis Costello’s album Blood And Chocolate. Instead of doing the sane thing, staying for their second set of originals, I booked out the door and up the hill.
I headed for Light Club Lamp Shop and walked in the door. I had a vague idea of stopping in at Hotel Vermont for a drink and a couple of songs by The High Breaks, but hoped the timing would be tight. I should have taken that bet.
For every moment that no one went on at the Light Club it made me wish I had changed my mind, but after 15 minutes or so, Maryse Smith took the stage, and I was completely content. Her songs are a bit subtle and very personal, and for whatever reason, the audience listened close and it was one of the most amazing shows I’ve seen her play. Her singing and playing were delicately soft but filled the silent room. The stunning power of the lyrics and music radiated through all lucky enough to hear it. She resisted the urge to play all new unwritten songs, and pulled out several classics like Good Thing, and Liar, and I Forgot, and The Way It Is. I was so glad I was in the room for every note she played.
I knew The Mountain Says No were on at Finnegan’s soon, but was not aware of the exact time and knew the band after Maryse Smith was pretty amazing. I chatted with Joe Adler and Kevin Bloom and Max Tracy, and Mike Luoma, and Alyssa Solomon, and soon enough, Arc Iris hit the stage. It’s hard to quantify their genre, it’s hard to quantify their sound. It’s easy to say it’s Jocie Adams with the guitar and keys and vocals and clarinet and angel wings that runs the show. It’s easy to say the stunning drumming of Ray Belli is really what makes the band great. It’s like he’s a male version of Jane Boxall Percussion, or she’s a female version of him. It’s easy to say that Zach Tenorio Miller’s Rick Wakeman style doubled handed keyboard playing makes the band great. It’s easy to say that Robin Ryczek’s cello that follows the song from mellow to mega-intense and her stunning backing vocals make the band great. In reality, it’s the combination that makes them so amazing. Their set was stunningly beautiful and stunningly powerful I’m not sure if it lasted twenty minutes or two hours, but it was glorious note for note.

Arc Iris at Light Club Lamp Shop photo by Joe Adler

Arc Iris at Light Club Lamp Shop photo by Joe Adler

After the last note ended, I went back to my supposed first stop, you know, the future, and headed to Finnegan’s. Most of the band were dressed as Doc Brown and I walked into the Flux Capacitor. A killer 1.21 Jigawats followed. The pulled our the cover of Rock Lobster->Mesopotamia. They scared us with the Space Weed Zombies, and kicked the night with a rousing Kiss Your Ass Goodbye. During the set it was cool to say a quick hi to Jedd Kettler, Ben Maddox, Johnnie Day Durand, Kevin Lynam and Matthew Bryan Hagen. After the last note I headed for the door, but had to hug Samara Lark Brown, just ’cause she’s so brave and strong. The walk home was easy and smooth. I know there was a lot of great music that I missed, right Bobby Hackney Jr. and Manhattan Pizza and Pub, but I caught what I could.

The Snaz and Vows at The Skinny Pancake October 17, 2015   Leave a comment

I had a great time seeing music that Saturday night. I had been interested in both The Snaz and Vows but had not caught up with either. The show was listed as 8:30-11 at The Skinny Pancake, so that seemed easy enough. I got out of work at 5:30 and was home by 6. I grabbed a bite to eat and headed out around 8. The walk was quick and lovely, though just chilly enough to want an extra coat. I walked in pretty close to 8:30 and The Snazz were set up and ready to go. They did not have the curtain pulled to keep the performance room separate from the dining area, so I could see that I needed to pick up the pace. I got in and settled as the band opened with Try And Try And Try. It rocked nicely and set a great tone for the evening. They are a four-piece band with electric guitar/singer, keys/backing vocals, bass and drums. The music has an upbeat alt rock swing to it. The songs are short and poppy, but have a bit of a sweep to them. Most songs had an opening riff that slid into some nice changes and just made you want to bob around. The singer had a nice and solid voice that drove the music and the keyboard players backing vocals, including a killer scream at one point, filled the songs out nicely. They played a song they said was very new, that had a little extra sweep to it, which was pretty cool. The keys had a nice flow to them and the bass and guitar precisely drove the songs. The drumming was super steady, but had a few extra fills that could turn the direction of the songs on a dime. Each part was played well and the whole show jelled into some pretty sweet songs. The highlight was late in the set when they pulled out Running Away From Home. Their other songs are just as good, but they had just a little extra poise on that one. There is a lot to like about this band.

I hung out for the set change and soon enough, Vows took the stage. They played as a five-piece with singer/guitar player, guitat/keys, keys, bass and drum. They were super tight and the music ranged from off-kilter dancey pop to almost progressive rock. They are the type of band that I hate to write about since I don’t know how to describe them. That said, I greatly enjoyed their set and they kept me engaged for the full 45-60 minutes. Each member played with passion and precision and The set was lots of fun. I think I need to see them again sometime to see if I can get more of a handle on the music.

After the last note, I took the long walk home. It was so great to check out a couple of bands I had been meaning to see, and it was even greater that I enjoyed both so much.