Archive for the ‘Signal Kitchen’ Tag

Arc Iris, Superhuman Happiness and Snakefoot with Stephanie Heaghney at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016   Leave a comment

Arc Iris at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Arc Iris at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

I had a great time seeing music last Saturday at Signal Kitchen. The evening began with a puff of smoke and a trance music flow supplied by Snakefoot. He moved a lot of cool sounds in and out of the flow and was joined by Stephanie Heaghney. She added bits of voice and flute into the samples that created the sound. She sang a little now and then and that was lovely to hear. There were no separate songs as such, just a steady transition of sounds. It was pretty cool.

 

 

Snakefoot with Stephanie Heaghney at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Snakefoot with Stephanie Heaghney at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

Clad in white jumpsuits and wearing head lamps, Superhuman Happiness took the stage for a very rhythmic dance party. The room was pretty full and people were happy and having a great time. They were joined by a percussionist, who’s name I missed, perhaps Eric, and Ray Belli from Arc Iris sat in on the main drum kit. The three main members of the band played keys and horns and Andrea Diaz’s singing was lovely. The only song I knew was See Me On My Way, and they did a great job on it. They played for an hour or so and the crowd danced the whole time.

 

 

Superhuman Happiness at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Superhuman Happiness at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Ryan Miller sat in on DJ before and after the Happiness set and played some great songs. I don’t think I knew any of them, but they all seemed to have a familiar ’70’s feel.

At some point, three golden caped figures emerged from the back of the room and rushed to the stage. They knelt before it and activated the Arc Iris sign, then took the stage and began to play. The trio sounded great and mixed a dance sound with some lovely melodies. They played fun and gorgeous songs like Paint With The Sun and Johnny. They reworked Money Gnomes from the first album. They played a couple of the songs from Joni Mitchell’s Blue album, since last time they were in town, they played the whole thing. They did an instrumental jam where the angel wings came out and followed with a powerful version of Kaleidoscope. Their set was fantastic and they ended the night with a well deserved lullaby encore. I’m so glad I went.

 

 

Arc Iris at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Arc Iris at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

Arc Iris at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Arc Iris at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

Arc Iris at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Arc Iris at Signal Kitchen October 15, 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

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Torres, Swale and Tyler Daniel Bean at Signal Kitchen January 23, 2016   Leave a comment

Signal Kitchen photo by Tim Lewis

Signal Kitchen photo by Tim Lewis

I had a great time seeing music Saturday night at Signal Kitchen. I met up with Christopher Larrow and we headed downtown a little after 8. We got into the underground standing room space, found a spot up front, and soon enough, Tyler Daniel Bean took the stage. I was just him with a microphone and acoustic guitar. Instead of sounding like a traditional singer songwriter, the songs had a nice indie rock feel but with an acoustic presentation. His set was not long but the songs were pretty good and kept me listening. The room slowly filled as he told us he usually plays with a full rock band. That made me a bit wistful, but I just went with it and appreciated it for what it was. I did not catch very much about any of the songs but the closer, Year Of The Snake was especially cool. I liked his set but now want to hear his full band.

Swale quickly took the stage after his set, and the pretty full room looked on as they began to tune up. The tuning coalesced and soon the opening strains of Waterlanding appeared. They let that song unfurl with all of it’s searing intensity. They followed with rocking version of Golden Crutch and kept up the intensity with Joyless. They threw us a curve with a Pants song that I did not know. It was pretty fun and rocking. They eased up with a mellow version of Beaten Down then pulled out the ascending and ultimately surging We Could All Be That Way. I think they had the whole room on board by the time they finished the song and let it gently slip away. They jammed back into high gear for the short and fast Jack Sharp and just let it rip for the closing Drug Laws. What a great show.

To be honest, I knew little about the headliner and really was there for Swale. Chris had taken off but I hung out for the headliner, Torres. While the band is mostly Mackenzie Scott, for the show she sang and played rhythm electric guitar and was joined by an electric lead guitarist, who also played some keys and effects. A keyboard player and drummer rounded out the band. The keyboard player added some bass tones, but most of the drive of the songs was from the drums and the guitar. The sound had elements of indie rock and trance and was pretty upbeat and rocking. I did not know any of the songs but liked them all, especially one in the late middle about a boy who wants to play God. She chatted with the audience a little and expressed an appreciation for being in Vermont for the first time, but for the most part it was just song after song. When they wrapped up the set they took a beeline for the lounge area where they could chat with people and sell music. I was a bit tired so I just headed out and took the cool walk home. I love going out to see music I know nothing about and finding great bands like Torres.

 

To quickly sum up   Leave a comment

Running late this morning, so no time to write up the Swale show last night. To quickly sum up, maybe I’m amazed we have such a rebel girl as Amanda Gustafson, who’s gorgeous and powerful voice kept us safe from the fear of being lost, even if the band were playing a new song that had a funky intensity that reminded me a little of The Mountain Says No. I’ll find out for sure when I see the latter tonight. Everyone likes to be with the popular crowd and listen to a melange of Black Sabbath and Kanye West.

 

Posted June 27, 2015 by tmusicfan in Rock Shows

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Maryse Smith at Signal Kitchen and Questionable Company at Radio Bean June 19, 2015   Leave a comment

Signal Kitchen photo by Tim Lewis

Signal Kitchen photo by Tim Lewis

 

I had a great time seeing music last night. Friday’s are always hard. I never get enough sleep Thursday night, so always want to take it easy. Of course, when I have a song running through my head all day, sometimes I have to force myself.

I got out of work at 7, went home and ate a quick dinner then headed down to Signal Kitchen. I got in and settled and almost immediately Maryse Smith began to play. She was joined by Brennan Gregory Mangan, and I couldn’t tell what instrument he was playing on the first song, but he played drums on all the others. Maryse played a bunch of new songs on a green electric guitar, and it was cool to hear her songs a bit more orchestrated, since I’m used to hearing her play solo on acoustic. They opened with The Way It Is, then played a bunch of lovely songs I did not know. I’m not sure if I need to play all of her music again to see which ones they are, but really think most were brand new. Either way, it was fun to just listen close and try and follow along. She has a great voice and a super cool structure to her songs. Her lyrics get intensely personal, and sometimes remind you of thoughts and feelings deep inside yourself. They played nicely together, and the music they made had a nice sweep to it. I went in with high expectations and was completely blown away. When they finished the lovely set, she checked on time and had enough for one more, but said that is all they had worked out. After the intense concentration of playing together she unleashed a solo version of Liar that seemed to effortlessly roll out of her. I love that song and she did a killer version. I’m so glad I put in the effort.

There were two more bands playing, but I started the night tired and headed out. I wandered up Church st and headed over to Radio Bean. There was a band billed as dream pop that I thought might be fun, but my timing was off, and they were going on at 10. I hung out for a drink and caught a few songs by Questionable Company. They had a nice airy jazzy flow to them. The quartet was made up of a woman singer, a woman electric guitar player who sang also, a guy on stand up bass and a guy on a minimalist drum kit. It was easy to get into their groove and sway to the breezy songs. The vocal harmonies were quite lovely, but when they brought up another singer for one song, her voice mingled with the lead singer’s voice sounded eerily like Joe Adler‘s voice. It was kind of cool. A couple of songs later I recognized one and they did a great job with Skynyrd’s Simple Man. They played one more after that. I briefly though about staying for a bit, but weariness led me out the door for the smooth walk home through the twilight.

 

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

 

Doom Service at 242 Main and Paper Castles & Alpenglow at Signal Kitchen July 19, 2014   1 comment

I had a good time seeing music last night. I got out at 6:30 and was psyched to see Alpenglow at 8:30. I had noticed that Justin Gonyea‘s new band, Doom Service was making its debut at 242 Main, I thought at 7. I walked into my house at 6:47 and was on my way walking downtown at 6:55. I thought I might miss a couple of songs, but was wrong about the start time, which seemed to be the theme of the evening. I hung out for a bit, and after a while, they started to play. They began with a building instrumental, and moved into a groove somewhere between indie rock and punk. The sound and structure of many of the songs sounded like they would be at home on the soundtrack to Mallrats. The four-piece band had two guitars, drums and a low slung bass. Everyone but the drummer sang, but the volume was cranked and the instruments overwhelmed the vocals for the whole show. I caught a lot of it, but couldn’t hear much of it clearly. The energy was good but the playing was pretty loose at the start. I was a little worried but listened and tried to find the groove. They chatted with the audience for a bit, after the first couple of songs, then lit into another that sounded like they tightened up. They played a couple more and announced they had two left. They really locked in for both, and if I had not been worried about time, I would have been saddened that they did not play more.
On the last note I was out the door. A quick time check said 8:15, so I headed to Signal Kitchen. They were not open yet, so I found a quick drink and entered at 8:30. In retrospect, I easily could have gone back to Twofourtwo Main, and caught another band, but erred on the side of caution, not knowing when the band opening for Alpenglow would go on. Inside, the room slowly filled, and the 30 neatly arranged chairs were moved to the audience’s whim. I chatted with a co-worker and her friend for a bit, and soon enough Paper Castles took the stage. They played as a trio with Padraic Reagan, on bass, so Wren had to play a lot of rhythm guitar, instead of the lead and effects that he usually does. The music was slow and gentle and moved along in its own way, occasionally slipping into an easily hummable section that you will have in your head for the next few weeks. A couple of songs had a nice build, and early in the set Wren played some killer slide with a wrench. The show was not long, maybe 30 minutes or so, and at the end they let Wren loose and played some fun rock and roll.
After a short set break, they started the movie projector and then started to play. The show was billed as GLACIER: A Collaboration between Alpenglow and VT filmmaker John Douglas. A movie screen filled part of the top center stage. The film from the ;70;s, was shot on 16mm and was a ton of time jumping cuts showing a journey through the west and across a glacier. The images were entirely human and stunningly breathtaking. The band played with a quiet powerful grace. The soaring vocals took the lead and a variety of instruments filled he room. They played rock that ranged from gentle and quiet, to flexing some muscle. Instead of having the violin and banjo lead the songs they wandered into, they slipped their slowly articulated notes into the flow of the songs. I didn’t recognize anything, and just listened, with feet and ears. The audience was quiet for the first couple of songs, then started to chat a bit. In the third song,, the intense images of daredevils traversing the ice, enchanted the audience, and it was quiet for the rest of the show. Some people sat in the front and many stood in the back. The audience thinned a little when the film finished, but most stayed as the band kept enchanting with each following song. Late in the set, the opening strains of Solitude brought an audible jolt from the audience. They played a killer version of it, and called it a night. A heavily demanded audience request brought them out for a glorious version of Catskills After the last magnificently gentle note rang out, I took the long walk home.

 

Maryse Smith, Cuddle Magic, and Rachiel Ries at Signal Kitchen February 28 2014   Leave a comment

I had a great time seeing music last week at Signal Kitchen. I got out of work at 7 and made it downtown by 8:30. I was hoping to swing by the ½ lounge to catch Great Western, who started at 7, but did not have the time. I walked in as Marsye Smith was set to play. She opened with a gorgeous version of Good thing and played a strong set of stark songs. Her songs may not be cheery but her lyrics are so real and human, it’s easy to get entranced. Her set was well played and she closed with Liar, another personal favorite.

Up next Cuddle Magic, from NYC, took the stage. With guitar, drums, horns, keys, laptop effects and a keyboard/xylophone player, they had a highly percussive sound. Many of the song parts were heading in a Zappa or Sun Ra neighborhood, but several parts had nice harmonies and a smooth flow. They were kind of interesting, but nothing really hooked me. I really enjoyed the woman singers voice, but it wasn’t anything that put me over the top.

Rachel Ries followed with a solid set. Several of the members of Cuddle Magic backed her up, but it was really her songs and voice that lead the way. Strong stand-up bass playing, and backing vocals, by Ariel Bolles added a lot to the show. Again, I liked all the songs, but nothing grabbed me as much as Maryse’s set. I still have an image of Ariel bowing the bass and getting a cool sound out of it, so that was a lot of fun.

It was nice to see the new version of Signal Kitchen, which looked a bit different, and exactly the same. It was great to see a ton of Burlington’s most classic music people in the audience. Being part of the community and hearing Maryse made the whole evening worthwhile.

 

Violette Ultraviolet, Swale, and Caveman at Signal Kitchen October 14, 2013   2 comments

I just got back from seeing music at Signal Kitchen. I was running late, but caught two songs from Violette Ultraviolet. I walked in, barely out of work, and caught the groove, wonderfully mixed with subtlety and intensity. I fell into their serious builds and ripping guitar workouts, and loved every moment that they were on. I was bummed I missed most of their set, but loved what I caught.

Swale followed with a perfect set. The sound was fantastic, they played like fury, and put me through the roof. They opened with a conundrum of a song and followed with a killer Faineant. Waterlanding was ripped from the sky excellent. Middlesex was gorgeous. Overcoat had a killer, over the top, rocking middle section. Everyone Likes to Fight and Popular Crowd rocked hard, and had me flailing with joy. They closed with a slow Good Medicine, that felt like it was going to rip from the start, but stayed mellow, until that switch where it took off to majestic heights. What a fantastic show!

I knew nothing about Caveman, and they took the stage with a full rock sound. They reminded me of the rock/pop sound of Longwave. There were elements of U-2 here and there. In general they had a full sound with drenched keys, a pretty sweet guitar player, a drummer who had that great bounce to his playing, but…..They never took it over the top. It sounded great, but had a bit of Coldplay restraint. There were several spots in the several songs I hung out for, where they could have really gone off, but every time they brought it back to the easy to find pop zone. I liked what they sounded like, but they just didn’t rock me. That said, I easily, and happily, got my $10.00 worth at the show tonight.