Archive for the ‘Johnnie Day’ Tag

Matt Hagen’s Shocktober series at Light Club Lamp Shop part 2, Angel Bones and the Filthy Fist, October 17 2019   Leave a comment

Shocktober 5

All photos by Luke Awtry Photography

I had a great time seeing music Thursday night at Light Club Lamp Shop. It was the third part of Matthew Bryan Hagen‘s Shocktober series.

This week’s version was billed as “Angel Bones and the Filthy Fist”. Imagine if you will, Matt Hagen alternating between a spooky guitar and a spookier keyboard. Imagine a long sprawling jam that rose from gentle beauty to terrifying heights. What could give the sound even more depth? How about Lauren Costello‘s amazing cello playing. What could give the sound a more eerie edge? How about Johnnie Day Durand‘s musical saw. Together they built a dark sonic platform. Once they settled in a little, Annie Parmalee cited the name of a movie and two characters. Chris Friday and Kris Brown became the characters and recited a few lines from the classic horror movie that Annie mentioned. Throughout the night they moved through some of the Halloween movies and some of the Friday the 13th movies. Some bits of dialog were just a couple of lines and some were extended sequences. Some were terrifying and some were outrageously funny. They hit on the classics like The Exorcist, Carrie, Psycho, and The Birds. The packed room hung on every word. Some lines were delivered with exquisite terror and some amusingly butchered. Sometimes they broke the fourth wall and asked, is Happy Death Day really a movie? And, while the dialog was the focus, watching Lauren and Johnnie listen to where Matt was going musically and staying locked in was my favorite part.

The whole show was a very amusing hour, then I zipped home to put a radio show together. There are two more eerie weeks of Shocktober shows still on the books, so head to the Lamp Shop for your Halloween needs.

Thanks to Luke Awtry Photography for the photos. Thanks Robot Dog Studio for filming and recording the show. I’ll be playing parts of it soon on WBKM 

 

Shocktober 1

Shocktober 2

Shocktober 3

Shoktober 5

Local musicians playing the songs of Leonard Cohen at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14, 2016   Leave a comment

The Super Full Moon before the show at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

The Super Full Moon before the show at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

I had a great time seeing music last night at Light Club Lamp Shop. The death of Leonard Cohen has saddened many people, so we did the only thing we could do, we got together and celebrated the music that he left to us. Some of us just stood and listened but most of the people in the room sang some of his songs.

The show was set to start at 10 and I arrived right on time. It took a couple of minutes to get going then Marcie Hernandez took the stage. She was joined by a poet who’s name I missed, but looking at the list of artists I think it was Mary Angelina. She read one of Leonard’s songs as a poem. Even without music Democracy was very powerful. Marcie took over and played lovely renditions of Going Home, Closing Time and If It Be Your Will.

Aaron Flinn took the stage next and played powerful versions of Dance Me To The End Of Love and Everybody Knows. His guitar playing was great as always, though a little less flashy than sometimes, and his deep warm voice brought the words and melodies straight into our hearts.

Kirk Flanagan took the stage next. I did not catch the name of the first song that he played, but it was short and beautiful. (per Kirk “First song was Leon Russell’s A Song For You”) Lady Midnight followed and was equally heartfelt. He closed the three song set with a gorgeous version of the overly appropriate Hey, That’s No Way To Say Goodbye.

Charlie Messing took the stage next and borrowed Joe Adler’s card deck guitar. Charlie sung in E minor and sounded frighteningly close to Leonard. His versions of Waiting For The Miracle and The Darkness were spot on.

Before the next performer, from the side of the stage, Lee Anderson read some of Leonard’s words.

Joe Adler and Johnnie Day Durand took the stage next and were joined by Samara Lark Brown. With acoustic guitar musical saw and Sam’s lovely voice, Hallelujah was mournful and majestic. The audience sang along and the emotion in the room was almost visible. Sam left the stage and Joe took the mic and Amen was quietly stunning. They wrapped up the set with Johnnie’s request for Treaty, and it sounded great.

Before the next performer, from the side of the stage, Lee Anderson read some of Leonard’s words.

Everyone had been playing acoustic up to that point and the Lamp Shop space was such a perfect setting. It was like seeing a ton of great performances in your living room. Ryan Miller took the stage next and shook things up a little. He plugged in an electric guitar and used a mini keyboard to trigger a beat and rocked out Chelsea Hotel #2. It added a little extra zip to the show and was lots of fun. He played Bird On The Wire on the keys and sounded great.

Lee Anderson took the stage next and read an extended piece about Edith that was heavily censored many years ago when Leonard released it. His reading brought us listeners along word for word and was enchanting.

The Leatherbound Books took the stage next. They are a duo with a singer/electric guitar player, maybe Eric Daniels, and Jackie Buttolph singing as well. They sounded lovely on Nancy and Tonight will be fine.

If Charlie’s performance sounded the closest to Leonard, Phil Yates set sounded the most like his own songs with Leonard’s words and structure. Don’t Go Home With Your Hard On and Is This What You Wanted were fun songs and sounded just a little different from everything else that evening.

Willoughby Morse was up next and played his electric guitar a little softer than most of the acoustic guitars. Suzanne was very powerful and quiet. Last Year’s Man sounded great as well.

Jeremy Gilchrist – Singer-Songwriter followed with a quiet intensity. Anthem was lovely and Famous Blue Raincoats was just stunning.

Matt Nunan played a lovely version of The Story Of Issac in and E minor sort of way.

Michael Jermyn played a great version of Tower Of Song and closed the night with one I did not know. It was something about I used to be Aristotle I used to be Brian Jones.

Lee Anderson gave a short benediction then it was time for the quiet walk home. Leonard may be gone, but his words and songs will live forever, or as long as lovely people, like the ones above, keep playing them. We can rejoice in the treasures that he left us any time that we want.

 

 

Mary Angelina and Marcie Hernandez at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Mary Angelina and Marcie Hernandez at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Marcie Hernandez at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Marcie Hernandez at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Aaron Flinn at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Aaron Flinn at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Kirk Flanagan at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Kirk Flanagan at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Charlie Messing at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Charlie Messing at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Samara Lark Brown, Joe Adler and Johnnie Day Durand  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Samara Lark Brown, Joe Adler and Johnnie Day Durand at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Joe Adler and Johnnie Day Durand  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Joe Adler and Johnnie Day Durand at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

 

Lee Anderson  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Lee Anderson at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

Ryan Miller  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Ryan Miller at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Lee Anderson  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Lee Anderson at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

The Leatherbound Books  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

The Leatherbound Books at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

Phil Yates  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Phil Yates at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Willoughby Morse  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Willoughby Morse at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Jeremy Gilchrist  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Jeremy Gilchrist at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

 

 

Michael Jermyn (I think)  at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

Michael Jermyn (I think) at Light Club Lamp Shop November 14 2016 pic by Tim Lewis

The Wee Folkestra at The Monkey House January 2, 2016   Leave a comment

The Monkey House photo by Tim Lewis

The Monkey House photo by Tim Lewis

 

I had a great time seeing music last night at The Monkey House. I worked until 6:30, stopped at home for a bit of dinner and around 8:30 took the long walk to Winooski. I arrived just before 9, got settled in, and said a couple of hellos. Quickly, The Wee Folkestra took the stage and the music began to flow. With three guitars, a bass player, a musical saw, and four singers, they created a nice huge sound. The lack of a drummer kept it from rocking too hard, and added a folky edge, but when everyone was going at full tilt, they sounded like a mini orchestra. Most of the rhythms were done on guitar, with Joe Adler and Aya Inoue playing acoustic and Eric Segalstad playing electric. This left Eric Daniels a little room to explore on bass. Joe sang lead on some songs, Aya sang lead on some, Jackie Buttolph sang lead on one and Samara Lark Brown lead a couple too. Most songs had a lot of vocal harmonies and were sweet and powerful. Their hour long set was nicely received by the fairly full audience. The sound mix was great and Johnnie Day Durand‘s musical saw could easily be heard all the way through, and she got to play most of the lead parts. I really like Eric’s lead guitar playing, so having him do mostly rhythm on guitar and mandolin was a bit different, but the songs are really more about collaboration than just standing out on one’s own. Most, if not all, of the set was cover songs. I did not know, but thoroughly enjoyed, the first song. Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of These) followed and featured the saw playing the keyboard part. Ghost In This House was as achingly beautiful as always. Atlantic City was a fun singalong. Jackie belted out a strong version of Michael Jackson’s The Way You Make Me Feel. Joe did his best Tom Waits on A Good Man Is Hard To Find. Ween’s Baby Bitch was fun, and featured a little bit of Eric playing lead guitar. They followed with a couple more that I did not know, but really enjoyed. They wrapped the night with O Mary Don’t You Weep which featured a nice full ending that kept easing its way down until it swept back into the full song for a bit, then really ended. Shortly after the show, I said a couple of quick goodbyes and took the long walk home. It always amazes me how much talent we have in this town and it’s so cool to see so many great musicians wonderfully combine in different bands. Thanks everyone!

 

Joe Adler and Johnnie Day at Radio Bean October 6, 2015   Leave a comment

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

 

If you weren’t just at the Radio Bean you missed something kind of beautiful. It was a small crowd, but we all wanted to be there. Love was expressed from and to the stage. We missed Samara Lark Brown desperately, especially on Atlantic City. Great emotions in the room. Powerhouse emotions sent to Sam. It was great hearing Joe Adler and Johnnie Day Durand play, and was great to chat with them and Jake Styles after. The power of a spirit condensed into a physical life, for a while, then exploded back into the universe, was discussed heartily. Beautiful night. Thanks everyone!!

 

Posted October 7, 2015 by tmusicfan in Rock Shows

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Radio Show 121 Thursday August 6, 2015 9-11pm Eastern US Time WBKM.ORG   Leave a comment

WBKM CREW

WBKM CREW

http://wbkm.org/

I just got back from doing my local music radio show. I walked in unprepared but think I pulled out a fun one.

Song before: The Rakes Song – The Decemberists

promo

intro

From our small city to the great big world, these are the Sounds Of Burlington. It’s 9pm and already dark. It’s still been rainy and chilly at night and sunny and warm but not super hot. It looks like this will not be one of the warmer summers on record, but there have been many stunning days. I caught some of The Precipice: A Vermont Music Festival last weekend and saw some great music. One of the artists that I really enjoyed was Abbie Morin, so I got her album and here is Peace Of Mind on WBKM.org and this is Burlington’s Kind Of Music.

1.) Peace Of Mind – Abbie Morin
2.) I Walk The Line – Zoot Wilson
3.) Avalon – Split Tongue Crow
4.) Two Sleepy Arms – Lendway

The High Breaks played a super cool show at Radio Bean at the Precipice. Three of the guys used to be in Lendway, so I wanted to play Arms since I have no Breaks to play. I love Split Tongue Crow and that is just a gorgeous song. Fun cover from Zoot. I think he said that was the modern version. Abbie is going to hit the road soon. If she’s in your town, check out her show. After the Breaks set I ran into Todd Gevry and asked if he had heard of And The Kids. He said he had heard the name. I recommended staying and listening. After their set he seemed pretty enthusiastic. I thought they were great and they played a killer version of this song.

5.) All Day All Night – And The Kids
6.) Brothers And Sisters – Joe Adler
7.) Sequoia 3 – Binger
8.) It’s Just A Ride – Bill Hicks AMERICAN The Bill Hicks Story)
9.) We Shall Overcome – U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders

I’m missing the Republican debate tonight, and I’m assuming I’m just going to miss 10-17 people saying the same Approved Talking Points. I had to play Bernie to counter some of that. Bill’s message still resonates hard. Binger played a killer version of 3 at the Precipice, and some pretty killer other songs too. I caught a bit of Johnnie Day Durand playing saw at The Precipice and wanted to play Brothers to give you a hint, and to thank Joe for all that he has done to make our town sound great. Love that Kids song. I’m going to play this next song because I love it and it’s great.

10.) If You Get Lost – Swale
11.) Small Town Movie – The Cush
12.) It’s Real Again – Zola Turn

I think I played all three of those songs because I love them and they are great. OK, on to the next song from The Mountain Says No’s album JV. This is the eponymous song.

13.) The Mountain – The Mountain Says No
14.) Can’t Feel It – Vetica
15.) Dead Or In Jail – Crazyhearse
16.) Holmes, Sweet Holmes – Cameo Harlot

I miss Harlot. Crazy just played the Radio Bean last Tuesday. I love the Vetica song. Hmmm, Mountain. OK, let’s go classic.

17.) First Kiss – Peg Tassey MUSIC
18.) Flypaper – Persian Claws
19.) Always Monica-Down At The Duck – Chin Ho

Three Burlington classics from three different eras. Great songs too. This is another beautiful song that I love.

20.) If Time Was A River – Anna Pardenik
21.) WhoNeedsFriends – Paper Castles
22.) Clocks On the Wall – Jeremy Gilchrist

Great song with great lyrics. Thanks Jeremy. Castles played a killer set at the Precipice at the Light Club Lamp Shop. Great song from Anna. This next song seems to be getting some traction.

23.) Burn It Down Bernadette – Phil Yates & The Affiliates
24.) Knight Ov Swords – The Contrarian
25.) Sayonara – Black Rabbit

I hope you enjoyed checking out the music of our town. Let’s do it again next week, shall we?

outro

promo

Song after: Arc Of The Curve – Fish

 

Gnomedad, The High Breaks, The Sun Parade, And The Kids at The Precipice August 1, 2015   Leave a comment

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

 

After working on July 31st, then seeing some of the music at The Precipice: A Vermont Music Festival that night, I got a good night’s sleep and woke up to a Saturday off. I still had moms car from seeing The Decemberists show at Shelburne Museum on Thursday. Around 11, I hopped into the car, drove over to Elmwood ave to pick up my cousins Matt and Jessica Pearson, and their mom Joyce. We drove to New Haven VT and met up with the rest of our family. My uncle David, Matt and Jess’ grandfather, passed away on Memorial Day, and while there was a service for him in his church in New Hampshire back in June, this was the day we were interning his ashes in his home town. The service was brief, but nice, then a couple of us, including Craig Pearson and Kook Cheney Pearson and Aunt Gail Pearson drove over to the farm where Uncle David and my Mom grew up. We ran into a neighbor who let us into the old barn then showed us the house, just down the road a few feet, that Uncle David and Aunt Gail built and lived in. It was a nice remembrance. We drove back into town and I dropped off Matt, Jess and Joyce, then stopped at home for a minute or two. I walked downtown to Radio Bean to see where the Precipice was at. Not a lot was happening but soon enough, Gnomedad hit the stage in Radio Bean. They played as a four-piece with guitar, bass, drums, and keys. Their discordant jazz, with rock drums, was interesting, but did not really catch my attention. I headed out to the yard in the back, and Johnnie Day Durand was seated in the performing space playing her saw. I love the haunting melodies she can evoke from the tool and was enchanted for the brief beautiful set. When she wrapped up, I headed back to the Bean and Gnomedad were playing some smoother mellower music that I kind of liked.

After they wrapped up, I looked outside and saw my cousin Michael Pearson, who had said he might stop by. I met him at the entrance to Light Club Lamp Shop and we headed to the back yard for a beer. The singer for Smooth Antics began a set with a guitar player. The guitar had a mellow jazz feel and Steph Heaghney’s voice was gorgeous. Unfortunately, I was mostly chatting with Mike and did not catch a lot. We then headed back into the Bean and The High Breaks were set to go on. They unleashed several surf rock noir songs and were as great as always. The last time I saw them they were a three-piece but this time the added a sax player who fit in perfectly. As always, Kevin Lynam‘s bass was locked in, Todd Gevry‘s drumming was fast and powerful and Matthew Bryan Hagen‘s guitar was super sharp. Matt’s song introductions were really fun and gave the show an extra bounce. We caught several of their songs, but then a loud sound washed in from the Lamp Shop, so we headed over and caught a bunch of songs from The Sun Parade. They are a four-piece with two guitars, bass, and drums and played some high energy indie rock. The songs were good and fun and kept me riveted. I kind of wanted to check back in with the Breaks, but just couldn’t leave. A few songs in found Mike at the end of his day and feeling wiped out. He took off, but was very impressed with the quality of the music. I hung out until the end of their set and was quite pleased.

I headed back to the Bean and the High Breaks were loading out. I waited for a bit, and watched some of the aquatic play that was happening on the street outside, and soon enough And The Kids hit the stage. I seemed to have missed them since they added Taliana Katz on bass, since Megan has had immigration issues, but they were just as perfectly on as always. The three piece lit into the set playing lots of great songs from their now classic debut album. The room was packed and everyone was dancing and having a great time. The band rocked hard and their music happily filled my tired soul. I loved every moment of their majestic set. When they wrapped it up, I said a quick goodbye to Todd, who was quite impressed with ATK, then took the long walk home. It’s so nice to know, that when you have a long intensely emotional day, that there is usually music about to help you fall into joy. Thanks everyone.

 

Samara Lark Brown, Johnnie Day Durand, Aya Inoue, Eric Segalstad, and Joe Adler at Radio Bean and Swale at Nectar’s December 30, 2014   Leave a comment

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

 

I had a great night of seeing music the night before New Year’s Eve. I was psyched to see Swale at Nectar’s, but got out a bit early on a slow work day, and got to make a cool stop on the way.
I arrived at Radio Bean with Samara Lark Brown playing ukelele and singing Time After Time. She was joined by Johnnie Day Durand who added some beautiful flourishes with her musical saw. It was pretty sweet, but was the last song of the set. At least I made it for that one!
Up next Aya Inoue took the stage with her acoustic guitar and was joined by husband to be, Eric Segalstad on electric guitar. His soft tone and gentle yet driving leads gave Aya’s strong songs a little extra fullness. Her voice is precise and powerful and I always have a great time when she is playing. They opened with Firefly then followed with Never Again. For the third song they brought Ari Bolles to the stage to sing the heck out of an Alison Krauss song that I did not know. They made it sound great. Ari left the stage and for the next song Aya told a story about the intensity of social work and how you need a release from the strain. Writing, singing, and playing is how she gets through, and the fourth song in the set, as yet untitled but might be called So It Goes, was a beautiful ode to struggling onwards to find the good parts of life. They followed with Come Breathe With Me, then Lions Den, and closed with something that sounds like it needs a full band, ’cause it can really rock.
When the set was done, Eric stayed on stage and was joined by Joe Adler. Joe said he was playing new songs, not any of the old favorites and they played a set of killer songs. The opener, Man Of Many Hats was fun, then Eric switched to Electric Mandolin for some powerful and delicate picking. Joe played the acoustic card deck guitar as they moved through Daily Chores, then pulled out a killer new song called Stratosphere. I think it may be one on of my favorite of his songs, after one listen. Coffee And Eggs sounded like it might be a little light, but was a solid song that I quite enjoyed. Joe said that Girl Behind The Glass was not about what you are thinking, but was about unobtainable love. Samara joined them to sing with Joe on Change In The Air. Back to a duo they played another cool new song then did a cover of Famous Blue Raincoat by Leonard Cohen. It was nicely done, and they had at least one more to play, but the clock on the wall said leave. I still had a great rock show to attend.

Nectar's photo by Tim Lewis

Nectar’s photo by Tim Lewis

I arrived at Nectar’s just about 10, but it was about 15 more minutes until Swale hit the stage. Sometimes they start slow and moody and let it build, but not that night. They dove right into If You Get Lost and the show was afoot. Amanda Gustafson‘s voice was right on. Tyler Bolles and Jeremy Frederick held the rhythm tight and Eric Olsen had lots of room to work out his guitar. They continued on, staying with the last two albums. Soul Piggy Bank had a quiet intensity as it unfurled. Old School brought the tempo down for a bit, but a killer Jack Sharp knocked the energy back into the stratosphere. Edible smoldered and Popular Crowd rocked hard. I think that was where Eric broke a string. Amanda covered the guitar part on the keys while he grabbed another and got back into the song. After, Eric asked if anyone could restring his guitar. Sergei came out from behind the soundboard and spent the next song and a half restringing it. What a guy!! Swale kept on with a fun bouncy Waiting For You, then kicked out a seriously intense Fainteant. Joyless followed and rocked hard. They slowed things back down a little with Golden Crutch and Beaten Down then played a searing version of You Are Not The Photograph. For the first time that night they reached back to the Verdigris EP for a killer version of Good Medicine. It’s so slow for so long then builds into a super intense Eric Olsen guitar workout that always puts me over the top. Time was running low at that point, so they kicked out a killer Everyone Likes To and that was that.
I’m so glad I put in the effort and was rewarded with a staggering amount of joy that evening.

http://www.sevendaysvt.com/vermont/soundbites-why-sergei-rules-a-look-ahead-at-2015/Content?oid=2500101