Archive for the ‘Caroline O’Connor’ Tag

Radio Bean Birthday Party part 4 with Swale, Lowell Thompson, Annie Battipaglia, Brittney Langdon, The Toes, Sarah Stickle, Sean Hood, Binger, Ver Sacrum, Shane Hardiman, Fried Eggs, Usually Wednesday, Kat Wright, Bob Wagner, Loveful Heights, Michael Chorney, Caroline O’Connor, Jennifer “Oh Lord” & The Riders of the Apocalypse, Joe Adler & The Rangers of Danger, Maryse Smith, Eric George, and Tom Banjo on November 7, 2015   Leave a comment

Light Club Lamp Shop photo by Tim Lewis

Light Club Lamp Shop photo by Tim Lewis

I had been down to Radio Bean three times and it was almost 4pm and I knew Swale would be coming on soon, so I hustled downtown (again) and arrived at 4:10pm. The DuPont Brothers were onstage playing acoustic guitars and sounding ridiculously good, but when they finished their song, that was the end of their set. Lee Anderson hopped onto the stage and had everyone go out front for a community photo. We did. Kevin Bloom climbed a ladder that was partially in the road and quickly took a few pictures.

Everyone moved back inside and the music resumed.
Swale took the stage and launched into Waiting For You. I love how upbeat and happy that song is. They followed with another mellow song, Beaten Down, then kicked up the volume. Jack Sharp rocked hard, then they closed the set with a rousing Everyone Likes To. It’s so fun to sing along to that one.

Next up. Lowell Thompson took the stage. This time he was singing and playing guitar, like he usually does. He was joined by Kirk Flanagan on bass, Bill Mullins on guitar and Steve Hadeka on drums. They are all masters of their instruments and it was cool to listen to them jam out three country rock songs. Bill’s lead playing was understated and very cool.

At 4pm they had opened the Light Club Lamp Shop and I think Kat Wright and Brett Hughes played there at some point, according to the schedule, but even though I peeked in a couple of times, I just missed them.

After Lowell, I headed to the Lamp Shop and two women were on stage playing acoustic guitar. I’m pretty sure one was Annie Battipaglia but did not catch the other. The song I walked in on was nice enough, then they went into a cover of Stand By Me. The audience enjoyed it but I was worried I might be missing something and went back to the Bean.

Brittney Langdon was onstage playing an electric guitar and had an enchanting ethereal sound. I really enjoyed the song and a half that I saw her do on guitar. For her last song she just used a pedal to trigger a lush full sound and sang delightfully over it. I really enjoyed her celestial set!

Just looking around the Bean and seeing some dramatically dressed people was a clue that I should stay put. The Toes came on next and played a hell of a show. They played as a four-piece with guitar, bass, drums and the stunning Pam Ant on vocals. OK, the guitar player sang some too, but Pam can contort her voice into something almost unreal, and does so often. Their sound is a bit like the B-52’s playing a Ramones song and they rocked hard. They rocked out three of the most delightful songs possible and Pam’s voice was almost more intense than the plugged in electric guitar. They never disappoint.

I hung out at the Bean as Sarah Stickle played acoustic guitar and sang. Her voice is really nice and her playing is solid. I really liked her first song (a cover, maybe called Sad Eyes), but was a bit distracted as I could hear a full rock band playing at the Lamp Shop. After her first one I ducked over, but the band did not grab me immediately, so I went back and listened to her second song, which was one of her own. It was quite good, and it’s quite rare for me to want to hear a solo singer instead of a band. Well done Sarah.

I headed over to the Lamp shop to see what was going on. Sean Hood was set up to sing and play acoustic guitar and was joined by another acoustic guitar player. It took them a moment or two to get ready. I popped back to the Bean and Andrew Stearns was on stage and playing banjo. He sounded nice but did not grab me so I headed back and enjoyed the mellow gorgeous sounds that Sean played. They played three songs. The second was a George Strait song, something about Amarillo. The last one was one Sean wrote about Springsteen’s song Backstreets. It was pretty cool, and Sean plays well and has a pleasant voice. I liked their set.

I headed back to the Bean and the tunic clad Binger hit the stage. I just love their rock sound that features a calypso guitar, Shakir Stephen‘s rapping, and the way they take such elements and just turn them into rock songs. They are super good. The began with If I knew and let it flow into Resurrection. Neither are on their album so hopefully they will be releasing new music soon. Towards the end of the second song they got into a long jam and brought it out with Shakir chanting Vote Bernie for me, Vote Bernie for me, Vote Bernie for me, Vote Bernie for me, then it changed into Bernie, Bernie, Bernie, Bernie, Bernie. I loved every note of the music and every sentiment they sang, even the non Bernie parts. Funny note, in the afternoon and evening I was dressed in the classic Tim style, but in the morning for the Dino Bravo VT set when I had moments to get myself together, I threw on the U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders for President t-shirt.

I zipped back to the Lamp Shop, since I was sure I was missing one of the acts I most wanted to see. Sure enough Ver Sacrum was on stage. The band is just Matt Hastings and the sound was a mix of exactly what I expected and not at all what I expected. I’d been meaning to catch him, since I love his guitar work in Vedora. I thought he would be playing some soundscaping on electric guitar but he was playing a bluesy rock song on acoustic. The sound was filled with flowing effects and created a great atmosphere, and the song just drifted into the universe. I only caught part of one song, but it was a long one and I was enchanted by his singing and guitar playing for every note. I must check out a full set sometime!

I took a quick breather outside in the cool but not cold air, then went back to the Lamp Shop for the Shane Hardiman trio. Shane played keys, Robinson Morse played stand up bass and I missed the name of the drummer. They played jazz, which is not my favorite, but each musician was truly stunning and I loved every note. I was enchanted and could not leave until the last note.

I zipped back to the Bean just as Milton Busker left the stage and packed up his guitar. Rats!!! I love his songs, and really wish I had seen some or all of them.

Three women, clad in black took the stage. The two on either side wore veils and accentuated the words with their movements while the one in the middle read poems and talked about Radio Bean turning 15 and how the place had finally become a grown woman.

I ducked back to the Lamp shop and there was a guitar bass drums instrumental band rocking. From the band list I’m guessing they were Usually Wednesday. Their songs rocked nicely and I had a good time checking them out, especially the very insistent drumming.

I went back to the Bean and caught Loveful Heights. They featured a woman named Maggie singing some lovely high parts, a lovely woman named Kat Wright singing the low parts and a guy named Bob Wagner playing some subtly beautiful guitar, and adding some vocals. They played Make The Magic Last, a delta bluesish When The River Sings Your Song, a cheery song called I’ve Left Him. They closed the set by getting the audience to sing along to Every Little Cell. That was a delightful set, and the last song has to be one of the highlights of the day.

I bopped back to the Lamp Shop to hear Michael Chorney sing and play acoustic guitar. He was joined by Robinson Morse on stand up bass and they sounded lovely together. Chorney is a great singer and player and his quiet songs were delightful. I did not want to miss the next act at the Bean so I ducked back over, but nothing was happening yet so I got to catch another one by Michael.

After that one, I went back to the Bean and settled in until Caroline Marie had her rig set and started to play. I did not recognize either of the two songs she played, but both had a nice dramatic feel with her strong and sultry voice over the top. I loved both of them. I chatted with her after and found out one was very new and one was older, but she had never played out. I can’t wait for her new album!!

I popped back to the Lamp shop to see a woman singing and a guy on accordion. They called themselves Jennifer “Oh Lord” & The Riders of the Apocalypse and the first song had a Parisian jazz feel. The second song reinforced that since it was called My Clothes Are Made In China But The Label Is In French. It was a fun set.

I slipped through the double doors, walked through !Duino! (Duende), and back into the Bean in time for Joe Adler & The Rangers Of Danger. I did not recognize the drummer or bass player but Joe Adler played guitar and sang and Samara Lark Brown threw her vocals at the songs. I did not know any of the three songs, and instead of the usual high energy classic rock Joe usually plays, all three songs were quite punk. The second was something about Gotta Find A Way, A Better Way. Despite being clueless about what songs they played, I loved every note and the huge intensity they unleashed. That was just a great set!!!!!

I ducked back to the Lamp Shop and Maryse Smith was on stage and just started to play. She skipped her more famous songs and enchanted the quiet as a mouse audience with some deep cuts. Much like the last time I saw her play the Lamp Shop, you could hear every nuance of ever note she played on her acoustic guitar and every nuance of every note she sang. She closed her three song set with the one that begins Winter Is Coming. That is quickly becoming one of my favorites.

I was completely exhausted at that point, but there was an artist on at the Bean that I was curious about. I went back and caught a couple of songs by Eric George. He got the audience to sing along with one that was pretty cool and closed with Drifting (?). He had a nice voice and played well.

I was done, but headed back through the Lamp Shop and caught the tail end of the last song by the legendary Tom Banjo. Listening to him sing his songs of old is like being transported back a century in time. He’s really solid and has put his mark on our town for decades.

After that, I slipped out the door and took the very familiar walk home. There was a lot of music left to come, and a couple of bands I really wanted to see, but was literally exhausted. OK, time to rest up and be ready to do it again next year.

Happy 15th Birthday Radio Bean.

 

Radio Show 134 Thursday November 5, 2015 9-11pm Eastern US Time WBKM.ORG   Leave a comment

WBKM by Tim Lewis

WBKM by Tim Lewis

 

http://wbkm.org/

 

I just got back from my local music radio show on internet only WBKM.org. It had a bit of a regal feel and highlighted a lot of the music from last week and this coming weekend. It was also seasonally appropriate, even if the weather wasn’t.

regular programming
recording begins

Songs before: God Save The Queen/Keep Yourself Alive – Queen

promo

intro

From our small city to the great big world, these are the Sounds Of Burlington. It’s been a super warm, maybe in the 70’s, day and it’s warm this evening. A lot of people are out and about and enjoying the night. Today is the 5th of November, the day Guy Fawkes tried to blow up Parliament. As we have evolved over the years, there is less of a need for such drastic action. In fact, all we have to do is elect reasonable and compassionate and smart people, and we could have a great government. Maybe one day. Tonight, let’s begin with Burlington itself. It was founded in 1865 and was a major lumber mill port that brought wood from Quebec to the eastern US. Early on, it was called the Queen City of New England. Let’s begin with some Burlington music about queens.

1.) Rock ‘n Roll Queen – Peg Tassey MUSIC
2.) We Rock Out 2 Queen – Rue Mevlana
3.) Queen Of Hostility – Doll Fight
4.) I’d Hate To Be Me – Queen Tangerine

Some of the regal music from Burlington. It’s interesting to see how we have evolved. We began by needing a strong leader, and have moved to a system were we can govern ourselves more and more. If we are cool about it, we have a lot of potential. OK, last Friday I caught a ton of cool music. I started with this band, although the set I caught was them covering the Elvis Costello album Blood and Chocolate. This is the next song from No Need To Beg.

5.) Drinking For Two – Phil Yates & The Affiliates
6.) I Forgot – Maryse Smith
7.) Singing – Arc Iris
8.) King Grifter – The Mountain Says No
9.) I Think I’m Turning Into A Robot – Wave of the Future

I began the night at The Skinny Pancake to see Phil’s first set, then hustled to Light Club Lamp Shop to catch Maryse Smith‘s stunning set. Arc Iris followed and were amazing as always. I hustled over to Finnegan’s and missed Mountain, but caught some of Wave’s wonderful set, including that fun song. There’s a fun show at Finnegan’s tomorrow with some of the guys in Rough Francis playing as Aspero Siacos, and a couple of other cool bands, like this one.

10.) Hungry – Heavy Plains
11.) Destroying Everything They See – Blue Button
12.) MSP2 – ROUGH FRANCIS

It will be interesting to see what AS sound like, but other two will certainly be killer. Saturday is the day Radio Bean has it’s birthday. As always they will have bands play from 8am to 2am, with about 15 minutes per band. This next band always kick it off.

13.) Chuck Berry – Dino Bravo VT
14.) Toejam – The Toes
15.) The Mime – Joe Adler & The Rangers Of Danger
16.) One More Sunset – Violet Ultraviolette

I’m psyched to see all of those bands play. I’m psyched to see these next ones too.

17.) ComeTooLate – Paper Castles
18.) Gonna Stay Up All Night Long – The Eames Brothers
19.) Pauses – Lowell Thompson and Crown Pilot
20.) Crow King – Binger

I’m sorry I missed Binger playing the Scooby Doo show last weekend but am psyched to catch up with them this Saturday. All of those bands rocked, but there will be a lot of music played that day. Here are some of the mellower bands that will play.

21.) Guitar – Michael Chorney and Hollar General
22.) Windy Pines – Kat Wright and Brett Hughes
23.) Matter Of Time – Eric George
24.) Puff The Magic Dragon – Linda Bassick

I’m not sure if Linda is playing kids songs or older people’s songs or both, but it will be fun to find out. I may have to catch Eric for the first time. Kat and Brett always sound nice. Sweet song from Michael. This next song is by Caroline Marie, who has played every Bean Birthday.

25.) Once Upon – Vedora
26.) The Night Syd Barret Died – Colin Nicholas Clary
27.) By My Side – Kat Wright & The Indomitable Soul Band
28.) The Next Instead – Swale

I’m thoroughly excited to see Swale already, is it Saturday yet?. Kat and the band are always great. I finally got the see Emily play joke in Barret. I bet he plays that one, what with the Radio Bean references and all. Killer song from Caroline. Songs 13 to 28 are just a tiny hint of what that day will sound like. Is it Saturday yet??? OK, let’s end where we began, with another song from the Queen herself, then I will say goodbye.

29.) I Remember/The Jam – Peg Tassey
30.) Sayonara – Black Rabbit
outro

promo

Song after: The Gathering – Fish

recording ends
Sign Of The Gypsy Queen – April Wine
Innuendo – Queen
Winged Victory – Brave The Vertigo
I Saw Her Standing There – Elton John with John Lennon
Diamond Dust – Jeff Beck
Now I’m Here (live) – Queen
James Bond Theme – Moby
Set Yourself On Fire – Stars
D.I.Y. – Peter Gabriel
Jealous Guy – The Black Crowes
Locked In The Trunk Of A Car – The Tragically Hip
Theme For The Scientist Of The Invisible/Domino – Masters Of Reality
The Old And The Young – MIDLAKE BAND
21st Century Schitzoid Man – April Wine
Heroes – King Crimson
Fractured Mirror – Ace Frehley
Glow Worm – The Church Band
Northern Memory – The Cush
The Last Straw – Marillion
The Endless War – Jeremy Gilchrist – Singer-Songwriter
What’s In California? – Joshua Glass Music
regular programming

 

Radio Show 126 Thursday September 10, 2015 9-11pm Eastern US Time WBKM.ORG   Leave a comment

WBKM CREW

WBKM CREW

 

http://wbkm.org/

I just got back from doing my local music radio show on internet only WBKM.org. I highlighted some of the great music in town last week, some of the great music coming up this week, some music to say goodbye and some music to say thank you.

Song before the recording: Weeping Willow – Persian Claws

promo

Songs before: Cloudbusting – Kate Bush (right, Pamela Clifton?)
The Inevitability Of Death – The Tragically Hip
After Everything – The Church Band

promo

intro

From our small city to the great big world, these are the Sounds Of Burlington. It’s a beautiful night in the Queen city and there is a ton of stuff happening this weekend. Grace Potter is filling the waterfront with killer local and national bands Saturday and Sunday. It’s Pride week. The Art Hop is happening in the South End. Before I get to all the great stuff coming up, I want to mention a show I caught last week. Rue Mevlana put on a truly stunning spectacle of stage and music. They wove casual and classic stories with a hypnotic light and image show. Here is a hint of what the music was like.

1.) Hermaphroditus – Rue Mevlana
2.) Empty Frequency – Rue Mevlana
3.) Magenta Man – Rue Mevlana

That show was beyond words, which is unusual for me. OK, Grace is bringing a few national bands this weekend, but here are some wonderful local bands who will be there too.

4.) I Forgot – Maryse Smith
5.) Give Me All Your Love – Madaila
6.) Running Away From Home – The Snaz
7.) Womb With A View – Heavy Plains

Four really cool songs from four really cool bands who are all going to play great shows this weekend on the waterfront. Tomorrow at the Art Hop these bands are playing at Arts Riot and nearby.

8.) Coming Down Again – Waylon Speed
9.) See You At Eight – Villanelles
10.) Staring Out The Window – ROUGH FRANCIS
11.) Let’s Go Crazy – Prince

I saw Prince once (thanks Kevin Joseph Ryan) and he was amazing, Unfortunately, Prince is not actually playing the Art Hop. However, a bunch of local musicians, with Craig Mitchell singing, will play a show called Operation Prince. It should be a wild time. The other three are playing at Arts Riot and that will be a great time as well. A little farther down Pine st, these next three bands are playing at Zero Gravity Brewery. The singer for the first band was also part of the Rue show.

12.) Toejam – The Toes
13.) We’re Closed – Blue Button
14.) Alienation – Black Rabbit

Black Rabbit have a new drummer and are ready to rock us hard. BB rock hard too. The Toes are so delightfully quirky, and rock hard too. I’ve seen this next band several times in town and am always blown away. They are a killer rock band and two of the nicest people you could ever hope to meet. I’m so psyched for their show next Wednesday at The Monkey House.

15.) Intro – Slingshot Dakota
16.) May Day – Slingshot Dakota
17.) Wave – Slingshot Dakota
18.) Grudge – Slingshot Dakota

I just saw that song on bandcamp and really liked it. Wave is a killer song from the first album. The first two are from the second. I can’t wait to see you Carly Comando and Tom Patterson!! OK, it’s time to play the last song on the stunning album JV. I guess I have to start a new album next week.

19.) Statistik – The Mountain Says No
20.) I Don’t Know How To Love Him – Jesus Christ Superstar
21.) Superstar – Jesus Christ Superstar

The Mountain Says No are playing the Art Hop on Saturday, so if you like that song, Go Check Them Out! I played the two songs from Jesus Christ Superstar in honor of my father, who died suddenly on Tuesday. That was, maybe, the only music that we both really loved. It’s hard knowing that he will never be there again, while wondering where, if anywhere, he is now. It’s been a long few days, but there have been so many wonderful people sending good thoughts that I can feel the love being sent to me and my mom and brother. I want to just play some of the music that has inspired me and made me feel love. Do not be offended if your music was not played, I’m just grasping for any lifelines that I think of. I don’t have enough time in the show to grasp even a third. I love you all for how you have helped and know we will all be there for anyone going through such a tough time. I want to start with a song from a man who’s love even radiates through social media posts. Last week I saw Joe Adler, who recently lost his father, talk about seeing a bird every time someone has died, and feeling like their soul might be in the bird. I don’t have the song Little Bird to play, so let’s start with the above mentioned, love radiating, Aaron Flinn.

22.) Scattered Birds – Aaron Flinn
23.) Dreams Elope – Joe Adler
24.) Ain’t No Sunshine When She’s Gone – Kiki’s Lost Nation
25.) New Appreciation For Sunshine – The Cush

I want to thank you indeed. Thanks for all the kind words, all of you. Life is full of joy and pain and dad always wanted to help the downtrodden. I think this song is highly appropriate.

26.) Joyless – Swale
27.) Ornan’s Song – Dirty Blondes
28.) Little French Earthquakes – Phil Yates & The Affiliates
29.) Today Is Tomorrow – The Red Telephone

I always got such a timeless feeling from that song. Thanks Matt Hutton. Thanks Phil Yates, and OMG thank you Raph Worrick. Thanks Rebecca Rogers, Diane Sullivan, and make sure you send lots of love to Ornan McLean and his family, because they need it too! Amanda Gustafson, Eric Olsen, you’ve been fantastic. OK, here is another song that I’ve just always loved and really want to play.

30.) Once Upon – Vedora
31.) Sequoia 2 – Binger

I just love that song too. I hope you enjoyed checking out the music of our town. Let’s do it again next week, shall we?

outro

promo

I always play a Fish song after my show, because I love his music and his ideas and his fantastic way of expressing them through his very intense lyrics. This week I just got an album I’ve been waiting for and just love this song. I don’t have to be up early so I can hang out a bit later tonight, so let’s go.

Song after: Empire Of The Clouds – Iron Maiden
The Great Unraveling – Fish

recording ends, music keeps playing

The Show Must Go On – Queen
Why Does Love Got To Be So Bad – Bob Wagner and the Book ‘Em Blues Band
Child In Time – Deep Purple
Margaret – Marillion
Parisian Walkways – Greg Lake with Gary Moore
The Next Instead – Swale
TFAY – Elephants of Scotland
Another Murder Of A Day – Fish and Tony Banks
Murder – David Gilmour
Flood Of Sunshine – The Posies
Catch The Rainbow – Rainbow
Bad Oasis – farm
On And On – Michael Schenker Group / Temple Of Rock
The Bomb – The Mountain Says No
What’s In California? – Joshua Glass Music
Dear God – Kat Wright & The Indomitable Soul Band
regular programming

 

Swaleoke at Radio Bean February 14, 2015   Leave a comment

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

Radio Bean picture by Tim Lewis

 

I had a great time seeing, and being a part of, music Saturday night at Radio Bean. Periodically, Swale play a night of cover songs and let people in the audience sign up to sing them. They call it Swaleoke and it’s always fun. Since it happens in Burlington, there are always a few great singers around, so there are some serious musical fireworks, but like a good karaoke, there are a lot a amateurs in the audience, so there is a huge element of random fun. A couple of times ago Eric Olsen said I had to come up and sing sometime and I reluctantly agreed. Saturday night, I fulfilled that promise.
Six days before the show I messaged Eric, since we had mentioned doing some Marillion, to see if they were up for Bitter Suite. The band learned it in a day, and I spent much of the week reciting the lyric, and trying to get to know exactly when to start it. I wasn’t at all nervous, until Saturday night after work. Then the terror struck. I listened to the song five times or so, then put on the black (with the bright Fish t-shirt under the dress shirt) and headed out the door.
I got in and got settled as the acoustic duo finished up their last two songs. I missed their name, but they were pretty solid. Swale’s instruments were all set up behind them, and the band came in and did some final set up stuff, passed around the song signup clipboard, then disappeared for a bit.
After a short while, Swale walked in dressed in green hats and clothes and were obviously intent on swapping the St Valentines Day holiday for St Patrick’s. They always do something fun like that. They got set up and started tuning, and the tuning turned into a drone like song that I did not know. Amanda had a cool weird vocal effect going on, and it was lots of fun. When they finished it, they started asking around to see who wanted to go first. A couple of people said no, and I said YES! I was hoping to go early and get through it so I could just enjoy the rest of the show. It was harder to find my starting queues than I realized, but Eric helped a lot and I gave it my all as it went from the spoken word part, to the softly sung part to the scream for my life part at the end. It was definitely more of a karaoke version of the song, than a pro version, but the band were amazing and hit it note for note.
Things went pro quickly after that as Pam Ant took the stage and put her wonderful vocal spin on Bowie’s Let’s Dance. She can do amazing things with her voice and really went for it.
I did not catch the next singer, from the earlier Facebook posts it might have been Kim Desjardins, but she sang a great version of Summer Breeze, and the band played it perfectly. I always think of that song as the breezy chorus, but the song as a whole it really good, and she sang it very well.
Up next Lily Sickles took the stage and just belted out a killer I Love Rock And Roll. I’m not sure which is her stronger, her voice or pure attitude, but both were at full force and made the song great.
Amanda Gustafson followed with a gorgeous and powerful version of Maybe I’m Amazed. It was very nice to just have Swale play a song, and it was a great version of it.
A couple named Melody and Greg got up next for I Got You Babe. It was a fun amateur version, and I forgot how many sections the song has. Eric was great about guiding them through it. It was classic and fun.
Eric Segalstad followed with an emotive Hello, I Love You. He physically threw himself into the lyrics and did a stunning job. I love that song and he put it over the top.
Up next Lily returned to the stage, accompanied by Caroline Marie on sax, and they did a breezy and beautiful version of Only The Lonely. Lily’s voice was great, and the sax just slid the song along.
Caroline stayed for the next one and sang and played sax on Careless Whisper. The song has such an iconic sax riff that it really struck a nerve with the full audience and had thunderous applause at the end.
She stayed up for the next one too as Joe Adler took the stage to sing The Power Of Love. His deep voice made it sound great, and the song is just lots of fun.
A guy named Andy, I missed his last name, did a killer version of What I Like About You. His singing was strong and precise and Lee Anderson joined in for the harmonica solo. Fun was had by all.
I missed the names of the two girls who came up next, but caught that they were joined by Greg who sang I Got You earlier. They did a fun version of Salt N Pepa’s Shoop.
A guy named Ben followed and sang a gentle version of The Commodores Easy. It was fun.
Jason Cooley followed and the band played hard on Public Enemy’s Fight The Power. He sang it strong and ferociously, and it was just great.
After that, Andy and Lily came back to the stage for a rousing 867-5309 (Jenny) that had the whole audience singing along with them. They were joined by someone named Mike, and it was nothing but fun.
The hour was late but Swale had one song left. They played a gentle and gorgeous version of Arthur Russel’s I Couldn’t Say It To Your Face.
Soon after they wrapped up, I said a few goodbyes and headed out the door. I chatted with Jeremy Frederick a bit, and thanked him for playing Marillion. I took the cold but easy walk home with love in my heart for all the pros and amateurs who took a swing at singing, and for everyone who braved the cold night and showed up to listen.

 

There is a video of the full show here.  There is a lot of empty space before it begins.  Swale’s first song is about 15 minutes in.

 

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/58827892

 

 

Quick snapshot of tonight   Leave a comment

I just got home from seeing music tonight. Radio Bean did not have a drummer or bass player. But ,I got to hear a lot of cool George Harrison songs, like Aaron Flinn doing a solo acoustic version of Beware of Darkness, Joe Adler singing a killer Give Me Love (Peace on Earth), the guys on uke’s, 12 stings, and 12 string ukes doing Isn’t it a Pity. Wow. The wrap up with most everyone, including Linda Bassick doing a Subterranean Homesick Blues impression, pulling back the lyric cards, for the various Eastern Gods referenced in My Sweet Lord. Hmm, so many great performances! Aaron’s solo on While My Guitar, will stay with me for a while.

Ryan Ober opened solo electric with a song I did not catch, the Roll Over Beethoven
Nowa Crosby and Franky Andreas used ukelele’s, a 12 string acoustic, and something that looked like a large 12 string mandolin. They played If not for you, Isn’t it a Pity, and Wah Wah
Josh Glass on keys, Linda Bassick on backing vocals and guitar at times, Kirk Flanagan, and Aaron Flinn played Something, While My Guitar Gently Weeps (with a killer solo from Aaron).
Joe Adler came up for Handle with Care, a couple from Revolver including a really tight version of Taxman. Give Me Love (Peace on Earth) sounded great with Joe’s deep voice.

There was lots more too

Vedora Manhattan Pizza May 3, 2013

Vedora Manhattan Pizza May 3, 2013

I walked into Manhattan Pizza to the closing strains of Terrarium. Vedora killed it, and played four new songs. They previewed a song for the Fleetwood Mac cover night, but it was their songs that really shone.

Terrarium
New song
Dragnet
Maria
To Send You
Basalt Anchor
Promises
Get on Board

Set 2
Sober
All in the Room
Jump Back
Solution
Ritual
New song
Careless Whisper with Caroline on SAX
Fleetwood Mac cover
True Blue
New song – the feeling?
In the Pines->The Chain
Let’s go for a Ride
New song
Newish instrumental

After, I popped into WBKM. I set up Basalt, Terrarium, In the Pines, and a bunch of George Harrison songs. Why not? Tonight, that was Burlington’s Kind of Music.

Hair Down and Steady Betty February 22, 2013   Leave a comment

I almost did not make it to this show. With Steady Betty set to go on at 11:30, and having to work at 9 the next morning, the numbers were against me. Knowing the sheer talent in the band, and that they would play a style of music that is out of my comfort zone, left me conflicted. Joe Adler and Samara Lark were on before them, so that was a plus. I almost faded, after a long day at work, but pulled off a last minute rally and headed to Radio Bean.

I got there just as Hair Down down was getting set to play. With my hair was already down, I got a beer, then Joe Adler and Samara Lark started up. He played a plugged in acoustic and both sang. They caught a nice groove right off and sounded great. They played a bunch of covers, including a joyous Sitting on the Dock of the Bay. At one point Samara whistled along and was pitch perfect. They played an elegant version of Atlantic City. An acoustic treatment to ’80’s pop song Sweet Dreams was very cool, and Samara drove home the vocal. They did a very casual Burning Down the House with a fun jazz/blues ending. Hungry like the Wolf started relaxed, but soared when it hit the chorus. How can you not let loose when it’s playing?

While the covers were fun, it was Joe’s songs that stole the show. One song about twirling was pretty fun. The song about the wicked witch of the west is one I need to get to know. The closer, with the tag line let’s relax for a while, was a beautiful way to wrap up their set.

During the break, I chatted a bit with Jeff and Matt from Vedora, and with Johnnie Day Durand from Wee Folkestra. It’s so great when fellow band mates show up for support!

On time, or close to it, Steady Betty, if that is their name, took the stage. Their rocksteady music was a bit slow for my taste, but the playing was so precise and the vocals so large, that I really enjoyed them. Miriam Bernardo and Kat Wright handled most of the vocals, but at times Linda Bassick and Caroline O’Connor chimed in, and their combined voice filled the room. Caroline, on bass, seemed completely locked in with Sara Grace on drums. Linda kept the rhythm on guitar and Christine Mathias was precise on sax all night long. The Caribbean music was light and fun, contrasting with the poignant lyrics about justice.

The crowd mostly filled Radio Bean and Betty had us dancing for the whole set. I was pretty tired from the beginning, but stood as long as I could. At one point my beer was empty. I looked at the clock and it was 12:35, and I knew I had to go. I slipped out the Duino! (Duende) door, and took the slow walk home. I could hear them play for about a block or so, then it just faded away. I probably shouldn’t have gone out, but I’m so glad I did.

Article about me in 7 Days   3 comments

7 Days photo of Tim and Vedora

 

http://www.7dvt.com/2013burlington-music-superfan-tim-lewis-makes-scene

Dan Bolles:

Scan the room at most local rock shows, and you’ll observe various types of concertgoers. There are the average fans, generally attentive people who form the majority of most crowds and tend to clump together in a semicircle in front of the stage. There are the cool kids, typically identified by hipsterer-than-thou detachment as they hang near the back of the room or by the bar, the occasional head nod or absentminded clap the only clues that they’re paying attention to the music onstage. There are the talkers, people whose constant babble suggests they’re oblivious to the performance at hand — or are just total assholes. There are social butterflies and wallflowers, hardcore fans and obvious noobs, players and prudes, drunks and teetotalers, cheerleaders and critics.

And then there is Tim Lewis.

Lewis is something of a Burlington institution, a fixture at local shows for close to 30 years. The general consensus is that he’s attended more rock concerts than anyone else around — though no one really knows.

Without hesitation, Lewis can recall the names and lineups of long-departed Queen City bands that most have never heard of, or have long forgotten. Save for the occasional political remark, his Facebook page is like the Yelp of local music, composed of reviews of shows he’s recently seen. And, of course, Lewis has a blog, Tim’s Triangle Tribune, on which he faithfully documents his live-music adventures. Like, all of them. Rare is the concert, whether at a club, café or basement party, that Lewis attends without posting at least some acknowledgment, along with what he thought of it.

“I think he deserves an award,” says Vedora’s Caroline O’Connor. “I swear he’s been to more shows than anyone in this town.”

(Cut to the town’s professional music writers slinking away in embarrassment.)

Lewis is not a paid music journalist. He’s not an A&R rep scouting for the next big thing — the guy works in the call center at Gardener’s Supply. He is, quite simply, a fan. And, in the realm of local-music fandom, Lewis stands alone. Sometimes literally.

At concerts, he can usually be found planted in front of the front row, notepad in hand, taking in the show with his signature fidgety enthusiasm.

It starts with a quick nod, imperceptible if not for the shimmy of the straight hair cascading past his shoulders. From there, the tremor progresses down his body, maybe punctuated by a jerky elbow burst from otherwise straight arms, a subtle, air-guitar-y flick of the wrist, or rapid foot taps. When a band is really rocking, Lewis’ entire body becomes a twitchy, rhythmic bustle, culminating in a sort of head-banging seizure.

“I’m kind of awkward,” Lewis confesses recently over coffee. “But music has always had a very powerful effect on me.” Indeed.

When those movements are coupled with his long, classic-rock mane — OK, it’s kind of a mullet — Lewis cuts a curious figure. To the untutored onlooker, his manic energy may seem strange, bordering on comical. But that’s not the perception from the stage. To at least one local band, Tim Lewis may be something of a muse.

“Lendway told me once that they can tell if a new song is any good by how much I react to it,” Lewis says, grinning.

“Tim epitomizes the guy that you want to be playing for,” says Lendway’s Matt Hagen. He doesn’t specifically recall telling Lewis he’s a human rock-and-roll barometer, but concedes he “probably did” at some point.

The average fan can lose track of the subtleties of a great performance amid catchy hooks or flashy solos. It takes a particular kind of listener to pick up on those nuances, or to care. Hagen thinks Lewis appreciates music on a genuine, profound level, so it resonates in him.

“When he’s in the audience, it’s an affirmation,” Hagen continues. “He’s that one guy who is absolutely going to appreciate the kinds of things that you, as a musician, are having conversations with yourself about.”

Lewis, 48, was born and raised in Shelburne. He shared a first musical love with legions of other teenagers in the late 1970s and early ’80s: Kiss.

“Ace Frehley’s guitar … those notes just always seemed to be in the right place,” he recalls wistfully.

Lewis is soft-spoken with a shy, genuinely sweet demeanor. He clams up a bit when pressed about his personal life. But he grows increasingly animated when the subject turns to music.

His first show was the Ramones at the Flynn Theatre in 1981 — with Burlington New-Wave band the Decentz opening. Lewis says Def Leppard are the “the most pyro” band he’s ever seen live, Iron Maiden the loudest. But it was Ninja Custodian in the early ’90s that turned him on to local music.

“I was never quite a Phish fan,” Lewis says. “They were kind of OK, I guess. But Ninja was just this furious energy … a funky, metal sort of thing that didn’t sound like anything else.”

Lewis says he was hooked immediately and has made local music a priority ever since.

How many shows does he see per year? Lewis isn’t sure. “Maybe one a week,” he ventures. “Sometimes two?”

That’s a lowball estimate.

In a blog post from December 2008, Lewis tallied the number of bands he’d seen that year. The number was 172, spread over a total of 72 shows at 23 venues. According to O’Connor and others, he hasn’t stopped being ubiquitous in the years since. Dude is simply always at a show.

“He honestly feels like a band member to me,” says O’Connor. “It’s a comforting feeling to have him [at a show], like, ‘OK, Tim’s here. We can start now.’”

O’Connor says she’s known Lewis since her days in then-local psych-rock band the Cush — an all-time Lewis favorite. As he has done with a number of local acts — including Lendway — Lewis has followed O’Connor’s career closely, from her early work as a solo artist to her stint in the duo Tapis Bleu through her current project, Vedora.

“He knows our songs and our development almost as well as us,” O’Connor says. “It’s a really amazing feeling to have someone who listens so intently. I don’t think anyone listens better than he does.”

Hagen agrees. He likens Lewis to an overeager student at the head of the class, absorbing everything, hand raised, anxiously poised to answer a teacher’s next question.

“And that’s what makes him so genuine and so receptive to what we as musicians do,” Hagen says. “To have someone recognize what we’re trying to do and be passionate about it is huge. And Tim is that guy.”